Safest-level-of-alcohol-consumption-does-not-exist

Safest level of alcohol consumption does not exist. According to a thorough global study of alcohol use and its effect on health, the safest level of drinking is zero.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 has examined consumption levels and its impact on health during 1990–2016 in 195 countries.

The research published in the journal The Lancet shows that alcohol use killed almost 3 million people worldwide in 2016. It was responsible for deaths of people aged 15–49 that year.

The researchers say most health guidelines suggest health benefits of consuming up to two glass of alcohol drinks per day. But the “safest level of alcohol consumption does not exist.” The study was conducted by more than 500 scientists, academics, and other collaborators from over 40 countries.

A new research based on data from 694 studies and then another 592 studies showed that 32.5 percent of people worldwide consume alcohol, of which, 25 percent are women and 39 percent are men. The study claims that women drink 0.73 alcohols per day, while men drink 1.7 alcoholic beverages.

“Alcohol is one of the major causes of death in the world today,” says Richard C. Horton, who is editor-in-chief of The Lancet.”We need to act urgently to prevent these millions of deaths.”

“The myth that one or two drinks a day are good for you is just that — a myth. This study shatters that myth,” concludes senior study author Dr. Emmanuela Gakidou, who currently works at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington in Seattle.

 

 

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